The Ghost Orchid is known in the orchid world to be a very difficult plant to keep outside of its natural habitat.  I can verify this as I have killed many young plats which I bought from Oak Hill Gardens.  I now have 2 teenage Ghost Orchids which I have had since early 2008.  I bought these Ghost Orchids from 2 different sources.  Both of these plants are doing great!  I have found that starting with plants that are a bit larger than the standard Oak Hill plants was much easier.  The Ghost Orchids are hanging inside a Rubbermaid container half filled with water, complete with aquatic plants and a beta fish.  This container sits on my porch which receives very little direct sunlight.  I keep a mister bottle next to the plants filled with deionized water with which I mist the Ghosts several times a week to remove any trace amounts of salt which might have built up on the plants from their daily automatic water with tap water. 

While the vast majority of captive Ghost Orchids die, there are several individuals who have kept and bloomed the Ghost Orchid successfully in captivity.  From what I have learned the Ghost Orchid needs fairly stagnant are with high humidity, high temperatures, and little direct sunlight.  Of course, in the wild I have seen Ghost Orchids survive outside all of these parameters.

There are many theories as to how the Ghost Orchids should be mounted.  Some say to lay the plant flat on sphagnum moss until the plant is several inches across, while some say mounting the plant on wood or wire mesh is the best way to go.  I am not in a position to say what works best, but most successfully grown Ghost Orchids I have observed in captivity have been mounted directly on wood or wire mesh with no media (sphagnum moss) what so ever.

As the Ghost Orchid grows it will put out new roots with bright green tips from the small, inconspicuous stem.  New Ghost Orchid roots may grow up to an inch a month if the plant is healthy.  It is totally normal for a Ghost Orchid plant to have some dead roots.  Do not try to remove these roots as you may damage the plant.  In general, the Ghost Orchid may be around blooming size when the plant is 5 or so in diameter.  If you have taken good care of your Ghost a spike will form over several months from the center of the plant and grow to a length of up to 10 (put more likely 4).  A bud(s) will form on the end of each spike and eventually the flower will unfurl.  The flower can not be self pollinated and it must be cross pollinated with another ghost orchid if you wish to form a fertile seed pod.  If you have two flowers and wish to pollinate, use a q-tip to remove the pollinia from one flower and place it n the stigma of the second flower. 

Soon after a Ghost Orchid is pollinated it will wilt and the seed pod will begin to form.  A long slender green seed pod will form if the flower has been pollinated.  Over the next 10-12 month the seeds pod will mature, turn brown, crack open, and dehiss its seeds for another generation to begin.  Ghost Orchid seeds pods are very rare in the wild and if you do happen to see one, realize that taking it would be a huge loss for the species.

Good luck with your captive Ghost Orchids!  Here are some pictures of Ghost Orchids grown in captivity.....please email me a picture of your Ghost Orchid if you grow one at home and I will add the picture here.
My Ghost Orchid Setup

My Ghost Orchid Setup

Ghost Orchids from Oak Hill

Ghost Orchids from Oak Hill

Oak Hill Ghost at Redland Orchid Festival

Oak Hill Ghost at Redland Orchid Festival

One of my Ghosts

One of my Ghosts

My other Ghosts - doing well!

My other Ghosts - doing well!